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Theory of Communication
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Ethnography of Speaking / Communication (D. Hymes 1962)

One of the first people to call for ethnography of speaking which is Ethnography of Communication which is a kind of subdicispline derived from anthropology and linguistics.

Eth is a kind of research method and it particularly comes from the field of anthropology, that is why it is one of its sub-disciplines and communication refers to the linguistics. The term ethnography refers to the systematic study we particularly mean a research method, systematic study of cultures and people.

When we say ethnography of communication is a kind of subdisicipline which is considered within the systematic study of the construction and negotiation of social meanings.

Ethnographers study the communicative situation, not the individuals or communities. They observe the communicative situations and observe their acts in a long period of time as if they become a member of that speech community. They usually spend a very long time in order to be sure and not make false assumptions.

Hymes proposed 6 units of communication,

  1. Speech Community: In order to call a group, community they have to share something common which are binding them together. In order to call them a speech community, there must be a shared language, and we use this term n a more comprehensive way, not necessarily referring to the linguistic code or national language. We can give examples of lectures as a speech community. Also, we need some shared rules of speech such as rules in a class, in an office meeting. We know these rules by some speech cultures such as school culture. When we say shared rules of communication, we speak rules of appropriacy in a contextual situation. As adults we know the appropriate rules of communication and use them in certain contexts and not use them in other ones. Even Twitter is a speech community and these communities are not fixed, they are dynamic and continuously changing.
  2. Communicative Situation: As the particular context in which communication takes place by the members of this speech community. When those members start communication in particular context, it is called the communicative situation. Speakers of particular speech communicaties have to how to take part in particular communicative situation. People may be members of the different speech communities at the same time. Is the particular context in which communication occurs. Such examples are, A court, a vaaz in a mosque, church services etc. Communicative situations have a specific patterns and parts such as opening sequence, middle sequence and end sequence.
  3. Communicative Event: Most of the time ELF lessons start with opening routines such as greeting, warming-up and then usually it is followed by a teacher directed lesson like teacher taking the floor and addressing the whole class together and this part is usually followed by an activity; individual work, pair work or group work, these are 3 types of activities and the last part is the closing routine such saying goodbye and giving homework. Each of these are a communicative events.
  4. Communicative Act: In every communicative event, every single utternarnces relailzes every communicative function is a communicative act. Here the important thing is, that uttenracnce realises one single communicative function. Such as when we say “Hello, how are you” in a class environment this is a communicative event but the sentences are are communicative act and the important thing here is functions of these sentences. Another example from daily life “May I have a coffee” is a communicative act and its function is requesting a coffee.
  5. Communicative Style: Refers to the way speakers speak such as do you speak politely etc.
  6. Ways of Speaking / Patterning: refers to the patterns of speaking in particularly communicative event.

For Hymes, In order to communicatively be competent in a speech community we have to know all the units above. Unlike Chomsky’s competence which is about knowledge, Hymes theory is more interested in ability to use the language, performance. Different linguistic utterances gain different meanings in contexts and when we say contexts we mean we refer to communicative events and situation, for this purpose, Hymes talks about context of communication defining communicative event,

Setting & Scene: We refer to the time, space and environment of the communication.
Participant: Who is involved in communication.
Ends: Here refers to purpose of communication together with the outcome of the communication.
Act Sequence: Refers to the communicative act. Sequences of act makes up the communicative act.
Key: Refers to the overall tone, manner of the communication. It’s like is it a serious tone, is it a mocking tone, what sort of tone.
Instrumentalities: We refer to forms of communication such as e-mailing, phone calling, casual speaking
Norms: Defines what is socially acceptable.
Genre: Type of speech or type of text. Is it narration, is it a everyday casual conversation, so what Is the genre.

In order to take part in a communicative event in a communicatively competent way, we consider all the factors above.

If you need to design any kind of lesson, activity, task when you consider a context you need to consider all the units above.

Speech Act Theory

  1. Locutionary: The literal meaning of an utterance.
  2. Illocutionary: When a word gains its meaning in a context, it is this.
  3. Perlocutionary: Result or the effect of the utterance

Example of Locutionary with “Sorry about that”

S: In a school in a hallway.
Participants: 2 book reading students
Ends: Apoligyziing for colliding to each other.
Act:
Key: In a worried tone.
Instrumentalieites: Formal speaking
Norms: casual school norms
Genre: dialogue
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Example of IlLocutionary with “Sorry about that”

S: In a dark hallway
Participants: 2 people, one of them is a mafia boss and the other is a debt owner.
Ends: threatening
Act:
Key: mocking and sarcastic tone
Instrumentalities: Informal speaking
Norms: no norms
Genre: dialogue

It has past midnight, the clock is ticking, time is passing. Lying down in my bed my heart beats as if I’m running. It is one of those nights, isn’t it? Those nights where you are in complete darkness and only accompanied by the wind blowing through the window, the eerie sound accompanies you in this slow and dark night.

What comes to your mind when you look around? When you look at the total darkness that is surrounding you. Are you calm or are you nervous? Can you dare to look at it or are you able to look at it?

It is one of those nights, when every sound counts, when your mind plays with you, when a single light is darker than the darkness.

Can you feel it? That you are being watched by the unknown. Can you explain it? That you’re scared of light more than dark in this night.

Close your eyes now and let the darkness embrace you. Ignore all the sounds around you, listen to the silence and sleep.

But, we already know, it is one of those nights that is going to keep you awake.

English Literature – Restoration (1660)

Charles the Second

Restoration Literature

-Every movement in literature is a reaction its predecessor.

Elizabethan literature, all those lyrical poems, enthusiasm, overflow of emotions but following Elizabethan Era, then came Puritans and then came the civil war.

Literature written between this period, this is a period which follows great chaos, civil war. The restoration of monarchy and literature produced by this restoration did not allow any extreme emotions. No religious extremism, no emotional extremism, it underlined and emphasized measure, order and calculation. They emphasized that we should control our emotions and we should not step overlain with them. We should focus on reason.

This is age of the reason.

Charles the Second came to the power from France, he was in exile in France with his family. When the common wealth ended and monarchy was restored he was chosen as the king and came back to England from France. He brought the French influence once upon England. French way of perceiving the world, meeting the people and etc. all about him was French. Included in this French influence was classicsm or neo-classicism, the French were really interested in the classical works from Romans and Greeks, they were fans of the Roman way of life. They translated most of the Roman literature into French and this king read all of the translated words and he was really interested in neo-classicism, when he got back to England, he brought all these with him and these ideas started to spread in England.

Not only literature, but dresses, architecture and etc. was inspired by Romans.

This new king who got the England from France, he wanted to do the same as French and be a fan of Roman life of style, their arhiceture, their dresses and etc.

In restoration we see “wit” as a very crucial part of the literature, so important that a good writer should have it in order be a good writer.
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Reacting against the extravagance of the late Renaissance literature, writers of this period allowed the classical works, stressing restraint, clarity, regularity and good sense.

For them, wit was a crucial characteristic of a good writer and it meant inventiveness and quickness of thought expressed in “most easy language” rather than unnecessary embellishments.
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A major question among restoration writers was whether the writers of classical antiquity (Romans or Greeks) had been better able to imitate human nature than the moderns.

Positing nature as the source and is imitation as the ultimate aim of art, the equation was to define the rules to be followed in any form or genre of writing.

Classical authors were widely translated and imitated by writers such as Dryden, Pope, and Johnson.

For moderns, studying the ancients (Greek writers such as Platon, Eurpides) was supposed to eb the same as studying nature itself.
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With the restoration, criticism of art starts. People question what is an art, what is purpose of an art, is art for art or art for people. People are writing literature of all kinds but are they all art? Can we name as Art?

So, we see criticism of art surfacing in this period and what does art do? What should art imitate? So, there is a thought of Art reflects the nature. In restoration times this idea of what should art imitate and who did it better became a very commonly questions.

(Classical artists vs Modern Artists)

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Dramatic poesy – Dramatic Poetry

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Dryden’s An Essay on Dramatic Poesy

Written in the form of a conversation between four speakers, three of which present the ideals of order, restraint and accuracy characteristics of Neoclassicicsm (Crites, Lisideius, Eugenius).

The fourth spekaer, Neander, representing Dryden himself, embraces the moderns’ innovations, defends English drama against the French and chooses “irregular” Shakespeare over “correct” Jonson.

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This period does not allow irregularity but in his work Dryden he is making a choice, he chooses Shakespeare, who is a very irregular writer writing in extremes such as ambition (Macbeth), Romeo and Juliet (extreme of love). Shakespeare was not a “regular”, whereas Jonson was pretty much “correct”.

Dyrden is defending Shakespare against Dryden and he is defending English literature against French influence and Neoclassicism. He claims that English comes with its innovations and the most perfect man for him is Shakespeare.

In this text, he praises Shakespeare a lot but why? Dryden is defending English here, he is saying we have Shakespare and you don’t to French. Hah they got you French. He says that Shakespeare’s irregularity makes him English and that makes him better than French and Greeks.

He claims that Shakpestre is the most “correct” poet, and this means the one who writes according to the rules (correct poet).

He compares Shakpesare with Ben Johnson, he says that Shakpesare is Homer and Johnson as Virgil.
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Dramatic Rules

Three Unities

  1. Time: In classical drama a dramatic play takes place in the duration one day only. It must take place in the duration of one day.
  2. Place: The play must take place in the same place. So when you are watching a play if the setting is London it must be London throughout the play.
  3. Plot (Action): There must be one major action.

Shakespare did not obey these rules. In the classical times the greeks and the romans wrote according to three unities. In neoclassical times, the French wanted to the same, but English did not want to obey these rules but Shakespare did perfect without obeying these rules and did he fail? No, he did great.

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Samuel Pepis was a scienctist and he was the president of an important organization called Royal Society for Science. Such organizations were very classified. This organization, its purpose was to advance science and learning, there was no politics involved and the members were interested in science solely. They were not in competition, they just wanted to do Science and Samuel was a that kind of a man. He was chosen as the president of this organization and at the same time he was working at Navy. He kept a diary, too but the diary was encrypted, he coded it, he didn’t aim people to read it.

He wrote everyday for 9 years, he wrote about everything in his life. He was constantly fighting with his father and brother, shaming his father for spending too much money, he crtiizwed his wife for her ambition to learn dance etc.

This diary shows us what life looked like in the restoration era. Years later this diary got discovered and it was decoded and everybody started reading it. When Pepis wrote about everything he also wrote about important things such as big fire in London which burnt down 1/3 of the whole city. He wrote about the kinds of gossips that people were doing behind the king and how people in lower classes talked about the royal family and all those changes that were taking in place.

It wasn’t aimed to be a literary works nor do we perceive it as it is, we read it to gather information about the restoration era.

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!10 Downing Street – Home of Presidency!

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We see how people getting increasingly social and urban. Urban life was vigorously expanding in those times. We see particularly following the big fire of London, the restanblishment of the city, it became very organized, the streets are going to be carefully planned, the roads going to be carefully made and the urban life expand. Slowly we see industrialization advancing and businesses thriving.

Many raw materials were being imported from the colonies at America and all these raw materials were in need of being used by different businesses in England and these businesses were usually in the City. We see slowly appearing Coffee Houses in the City where business owners and educated people to come to talk about business, general life affairs and mostly in this coffee houses we see political discussions with different idelogies and we see that who do get into these ideas do not fight with each other but tolerate each other and get to know each other in such places.

Now there is a very influential middle-class and they are making terrific money, they are not nobles, they have no lands but with all these money they started buying lands without titles such as being a lord. One way to get title is marrying ladies from royal families. We see a new class emerge in England and at the same time we see on the political side, we see basic two political parties emerge in England. The Tories supported the kind and Wigs supported Parliament and they were the opposition. These two parties formed in the parliament, supporters of thes parties gathered in the coffee houses they started arguing about their political views but they were not quarreling but modernly exchanging ideas. These coffee houses had this significance of exchange of ideas.

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!Every Sunday was marked as (Lord’s Day) in this diary!

Although with restoration the puritans were suppressed, there were still some puritan practices were ongoing. With the restoration all the theaters were reopened but there were still some practices that did not change such as going to Church on Sunday, the pups were closed on Sundays.

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We see that in his diary that gambling is becoming a sport for not only for money but for fun. Gentleman come together at night to play some card and slowly these slowly evolved into Gentlemen’s Club. We see that with these clubs a new form of sociality but still the religion continues to be an issue, in order to prevent this they made a bloodless revolution and they made a law, they brought someone from William Orange and put him to the throne and the next in line Queen Ann ( The favorite), with Queen Ann the Stewart Dynasty comes to and end but before she dies England, Ireland and Scots agree on union and becomes United Kingdom and slowly England establish itself as an Empire rather than a country. They embraced the flag of Union Jack.

Özel Öğretim Yöntemleri
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Syllabus vs Curriculum

Syllabus: It answer the question of what to teach.
Curriculum:

Develop awareness of what we are doing and what is our job.

ESL: English as a second language
EFL: English as a foreign language
TESOL: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Teaching English in Turkey vs teaching English in Nigeria, is it the same thing? Absolutely not, English is an official language in Nigeria but in Turkey it is not.

These separations do not validate in our time, for this reason TESOL has been founded in USA.

In Europe, some people say that Teaching Additional Language to Speakers of Other Languages has been founded.

We are multilingual people, in that sense terms like ESL, EFL are not valid in our time now.

ESP: English for Specific Purposes, English for certain businesses for example.
EAP: English for Academic Purposes such as English Language Teaching major in Istanbul University.
ELF: English as Lingua Franca, We teach English to our students to enable them to talk to anyone.
ELFA: English as an Academic Lingua Franca, such as us speaking in English in our classes due to foreign students in our classes.
WE: World Englishes, there is no one English in the world, such as Singlish, Hong Kong English.
EIL: English as an International Language, some people are suspicious of ELF as if it has got its unique language. So they stand with this.

Commodification of English, English as a Commodity: Monetization of English, Prosperity through English

ELT is different from Teaching German or Russian, as it has much many speakers than the other languages.


Puritanism & Puritans

The roots of USA go back to Puritanism. Puritanism was a religion related issue, actually it was a reform movement.

This reform movement started to purify the Anglican Church. They thought that the people were being pulled away from the true virtues of the Church, for this reason this reform movement started.

These puritans had a certain way of dressing, they dressed in black and white for example ladies wore black dresses with white collars. Their homes were very simple. The kind of church they wanted to go and pray in was simple. The man wore mostly black and they had pointy hats.

The puritans believed in the teachings of Calvin. This man claims that there is no free will. Although it doesn’t put out free will completely, it pretty much conflicts with it. Calvin taught that it was okay to work for money. Calvin proposed money making businesses and his believers wanted to make a lot of money.

Puritans were not poor people, they were people who was rich and chosen a simplistic life style.

Civil War Broke Out (Royalists vs Parliament)

Puritans did not support the king as majority of the parliament consisted of puritans and as the king wasn’t a good king.

In this civil war, puritans were being hunted and most of them stayed in England but a lot of them fled the country, first to Netherlands and then most of them fled to United States and they established the first Colonies, they worked and lived in the new world. The first settlers of the United States were puritans, criminals, whores, so all of these people either fled to USA or they wanted to start a new life in the States. This new life in the states was basically puritan.

Movies Recommendation: Scarlet Letter

Puritanism in Literature

John Milton

He was a great writer but he was very tempered. He was highly intelligent, he studied at Cambridge and took lessons over health but he wasn’t happy with his major, so he changed his major to mathematics. He was a very

After finishing Cambridge, he continued his studies on his own for 5 years and learned to speak Italy.

He supported the Puritanism, he was a supporter of the parliament. He had some conflicts such as he believed in independence, individualism and freedom but contrary to himself he believed that all these should have a limit to themselves.

He wrote poems, he wrote propaganda for the puritans but at that he wrote his masterpiece known as Paradise Lost.

In English there are multiple words that means Cennet in Turkey such as Paradise, Heaven, Eden.

John Milton was a religious man and he wanted to write about an epic. In this epic he didn’t only want to write about heroes and villains but he wanted to write a religious epic. He wanted to base it on the Bible.

He wanted to make it his mission that anyone who read his work would accept the God as the Almighty Creator. He wanted to argue many things that got brought by the puritanism.

He wanted to talk about;

Fate:
Free Will:
Predestination:
Destiny:
Justice:

He wanted to talk about all these in setting of Bible. He borrowed the story of Genesis.

Story of Genesis from the Christian Perspective
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God did not want Adam and Eve to eat from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Eve because that would cause them lose their innocence. You would do bad only when you lose your innocence.

Before eating from the tree, Adam and Eve were innocent.

Milton wanted to work on this story in the form of poetry but he wanted it to be a grand production. It is an Epic written in 12 books. He was blind when he was writing these books and his wife, secretary and daughters helped him to complete this hard task.

Providence: It’s an idea from Puritanism that means God sees all and has the power to determine all.

Man’s first disobedience is the subject of Paradise Lost. In the beginning of Paradise Lost, Satan already rebelled against the God and they were thrown into Hell.

The power of mind; Satan claims that living in paradise may be a hell for him and living in hell may be a heaven for him depending on his perspective. He chooses hell over heaven for his beliefs and cause. In this situation the pride in himself shows itself as the chooses to reign over Hell rather than being a servant in Heaven.

[John Milton was criticized for making Satan as hero of his Epic, in this Paradise Lost, Satan has a character that makes you relate to him and understand him]

God speaks of Adam and Eve and points out that all these were their fault, that they did this to themselves. Adam and Eve had fallen from Heaven, had fallen from the eyes of God, had fallen from good to evil for committing the sin. But, God, knew all these would happen all along. He claims that he created Adam and Eve to able to choose good and stood but he also let them to commit sins which resulted in banishment.

Predestination vs Foreknowledge

[In the description of Paradise Lost, Tree of Life is next to Tree of Knowledge]

Satan wants to a revenge as he is kicked from paradise, he believes that he didn’t deserve that. He knew that God loves his creations and especially Adam and Eve. Satan had this idea of tricking Adam and Eve and make them disobey God. He feels that it is a better idea to start with Eve as Adam is in love with Eve and Adam will do everything for Eve. He enters to Eve’s dream and he starts talking about nice things and giving ideas, when she wakes up and talks with Adam, Adam warns Eve about Satan. Later on, when they get separated, Satan disguises himself as a serpent and he tells Eve “5-6”, he then succeeds in his plan and she loses her innocence. After all these, Eve wants Adam to eat the fruit and he eats the fruit for the love he has for Eve. After they lose their innocence, they release that they are naked (they were naked all along) and they try to hide their body parts and they feel ashamed. Finally, God banishes them for committing the sin.

Milton justifies the ways of God with this Epic.

After a while Milton wrote another book as sequel to this book and the book is about Jesus and the name of the book is Paradise Regained.

A Language Story

Lingua franca, that is a language used widely for communication between people who do not share the same first (or even second) language.

English is also, of course, a mother tongue for many people in the world, though, as we shall see, such “native speakers” are increasingly out-numbered by people who have English as a second or third language.

There are currently around 1.5 billion speakers of English worldwide, of whom only some 329 million are native speakers. A quarter of the world’s population speaks English, in other words, and native speakers are in a proportionately ever-decreasing minority.

The Triumph of English

A Colonial History

Colonialism

When the Pilgrim Fathers landed on the Massachusetts coast in 1620 after their eventful journey from Plymouth, England, they brought with them not just a set of religious beliefs, nor only a pioneering spirit and a desire for colonization, but also their language.

It was the same in Australia, too. When commander Philip planted the British flag in Sydney Cove on January 26th, 1788, it wasn’t just a bunch of British convicts and their guardians who disembarked, but also a language.

It became something little like a lingua franca in India, where a plethora of indigenous languages made the use of any one of them as a whole-country system problematic. The imposition of English as the one language of administration helped maintain the colonizer’s power.

Economics

Economy

Economic power that ensures languages survival and growth. A major factor in the growth of English has been the spread of global commerce, pushed on by the dominance of the United States as a world economic power.

Commercial activity has helped fan the flames of English, but it is no longer possible to see this only in terms of one-way traffic.

Information Exchange

Academic

A great deal of academic discourse around the world takes place in English. It is often a lingua franca of conferences, for example, and may journal articles in fields as diverse as astrophysics and zoology have English as a default language.

The first years of the Internet as a major channel for information exchange also saw a marked predominance of English.

Travel

Travel

Much travel and tourism is carried on, around the world, in English.

A visit to most airports around the globe will reveal signs not only in the language of that country but also in English, just as many airline announcements are glosses in English, too.

English is also the preferred language of air traffic control in many countries and is used widely in sea travel communication.

Popular Culture

Popular Culture

Many people who are regular cinemagoers (or TV viewers) frequently hear English on subtitled films coming out of the USA.

The advent of film and recording technology greatly enhanced the worldwide penetration of English. In addition, countries such as the USA, Britain, Canada and Australia do their best to promote their culture overseas and to attract people to choose them as a study destination.

The Effect of English

Effect

Not everyone sees the growth of English as a benign or even desirable phenomenon. Many people worry about what it means for the cultures and languages it comes into contact with, seeing its teaching as a form of cultural or linguistic “imperialism”. They argue that, as we have seen, English has been regarded by some as a way of promoting military, cultural or economic hegemony.

The view that learners and non-native speakers of English are victims of linguistic and cultural imperialism is not shared by everyone.

An issue that concerns everyone who follows the rise of English is the impact it has on the other languages it comes into contact with. This concern is articulated in the knowledge that of the approximately 6000 extant languages in the world, at least half may be lost within the next hundred years.

Language death is a frightening and ongoing problem in much the same way that species loss is a threat to the biodiversity on our planet; for once lost, a language cannot be resurrected and its loss takes with it cultures and customs and ways of seeing the world through its use of metaphor, idiom and grammatical structuring.

In this context, a powerful argument is that as more and more people speak English, languages will gradually be lost.

Although there can be no doubt that the spread of English has some impact on other languages, creating a casual link between this language death seems somewhat simplistic.

In the first place, languages are under threat from a wide variety of sources, not just English. Spanish threatens some Andean languages, French battles it out with Euskara and Flemish, and the number of Mandarin and Arabic speakers is growing all the time – not to mention the growing growing influence that speakers of these languages exert in the international community.

A much more important predictor of language survival will be whether there is till a viable community with its own social and cultural identity to keep a language alive. In other words, survival is as much social as linguistic.

It is possible, of course that many of these languages may be lost from one generation to the next. But language is bound up with identity, and there are many examples of successful identity-grounded fightbacks.

Since the Balkan wars of 1990s, for example, Serbians, Bosnians and Croatians have all taken the original “Yugoslavian” Serbo-Croatian and started to mold it into three new varieties (Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian), emphasizing as many differences between these varieties as possible.

Members of the European Parliament who are competent speakers of English nevertheless use their own languages in plenary sessions as a highly charged statement of political and cultural identity.

Rather than fearing English as a destroyer, we should, perhaps, concentrate on how to maintain communities with a strong enough identity to preserve the language they represent. It is even possible that the presence of English as a lingua franca actually provokes speakers of minority languages to protect and promote their own languages.

English as a Global Language

Global

In 1985 Kachru described the world of English in terms of three circles. In the inner circle he put countries such as Britain, USA, Australia, etc. where English is the primary language.

The outer circle contained countries where English had become an official or widely-used second language. These include India, Nigeria, Singapore, etc.

Finally, the expanding circle represented those countries where English was learnt as a foreign language such as Poland, Japan, Mexico, Hungary, etc.

Old

It was once assumed that there was some kind of inbuilt superiority for inner circle speakers. They spoke “better” English, and there were more of them. Among other things, this situation “bred an extremely enervating inferiority complex among many a non-native speaker learner/teacher”

Since the majority of competent English speakers are not native speakers, but second-language users – the inner circle has lost much of its linguistic power, real or imagined. As a result, a consensus has emerged that instead of talking about inner, outer and expanding circle Englishes, we need to recognize “World Englishes”

Nobody owns English any more, in other words – or perhaps we could say that we all, “native” and “non-native” speakers alike, own it together in a kind of international shareholders’ democracy since whatever English we speak – Indian English, British English or Malaysian English, we have, or should have, equal rights as English users.

Native speakers may actually be at a disadvantage, especially if we compare less educated native speakers with highly competent and literate second-language English users. The speaker of World English is, perhaps, capable of dealing with a wider range of English varieties than someone stuck with native-speaker attitudes

New

The emergence of global English has caused Kachru to propose a new circle diagram where language affiliation (and ethnicity) is less important than a speaker’s proficiency. He still wishes to make a distinction between the inner core and everyone else, but outside that inner core, the main difference is between high and low proficiency users.

The Future of English

Future

In 1998 David Graddol considered a number of future possibilities, all of which questioned the certainty of English as the number one world language. He pointed out, for example, that the fastest-growing language community in the USA was (and is) Hispanic.

It is highly possible that in the foreseeable future the entire American continent will be an English-Spanish bilingual zone. He also suggested that other languages such as Mandarin, Hindu and Arabic would gain in status and importance as their geopolitical and economic power increased.

He now suggests that there will be about 3 billion English speakers by the year 2040.

In 1999 the company Computer Economics said that the proportion of first language English-speaker users to speakers of other languages was 54%:46%, but that by 2005 that balance would change to 43%:57% – in other words, the number of other-language users would rise sharply.

What we do know is that because native speakers are becoming less and less “powerful” in the daily use of the language, we will have to adjust the way in which both native and non-native speaker experts have traditionally thought about learning and teaching English around the world.

EFL, ESL, ESOL & ELF

Change

ESP (English for Specific Purposes): English for specialties such as nursing or paper technology or banking.

EAP (English for Academic Purposes): To describe courses and materials designed specifically to help people who want to use their English in academic contexts.

EFL (English as a Foreign Language): Described situations where students were learning English in order to use it with any other English speakers in the world – when the students might be tourists or business people.

ESL (English as a Second Language) students, on the other than, were described as usually living in a target-language community (e.g. Britain, USA, etc.) and needed the target language in order to survive and prosper in that community, doing such things as renting apartments, accessing the local health service, etc.

The distinction has become difficult to sustain, however, for two reasons.

  • Firstly, many communities – whether in English – or non-English-speaking countries – are now multilingual and English is a language of communication.
  • Secondly, however, many students of EFL use English in a global context, as we have seen.

Using English for international communication, especially on the Internet, means that our students are in fact part of a global target-language community.

Online

With the picture shifting like this, it makes sense to blur the distinction and say, instead that whatever situation we are in, we are teaching ESOL (English to Speakers of Other Languages).

English as a Lingua Franca

Lingua franca – that is between two people who do not share the same language and for whom English is not their mother tongue.

Communication

Barbara Seidlhofer at the University of Vienna has noted a number of somewhat surprising characteristics, including:

  • Non-use of third person present simple tense -s (She look very sad)
  • Interchangeable use of the relative pronouns who and which (a book who, a person which)
  • Omissions of definite and indefinite articles where they are obligatory in native-speaker English, and insertion where they do not occur in native English.
  • Use of an all-purpose tag question such as isn’t it? Or no? instead of shouldn’t they? (They should arrive soon, isn’t it?)
  • Increasing of redundancy by adding prepositions (We have to study about … and Can we discuss about …?), or by increasing explicitness (black color versus black and How long time? versus How long?)
  • Heavy reliance on certain verbs of high semantic generality, such as do, have, make, put, take.
  • Pluralization of nouns which are considered uncountable in native-speaker English (informations, staffs, advices)
  • Use of that clauses instead of infinitive constructions (I want that we discuss about my dissertation)

As Jennifer Jenkin’s points out “…the belief in native-speaker ownership persist among both native and non-native speakers”the evidence suggests that non-native speakers are not conforming to a native-English standard. Indeed they seems to get along perfectly well despite the fact that they miss things out and put things in which they “should not do”. Not only this, but they are actually better at “accommodating” – that is negotiating shared meaning through helping each other in a more cooperative way – than, it is suggested, native speakers are when talking to second language speakers.

In other words, non-native speakers seem to be better at ELF communication than native speakers are

Rethink!

Jenkin’s discusses “the need to abandon the native speaker as the yardstick and to establish empirically some other means of defining an expert speaker of English, regardless of whether they happen to be a native or non-native speaker”

The traditional “gatekeepers” of English (inner circle teachers, publishers, and testing organizations) may have to think again, in other words, and it is only a short step from this realization to the suggestion that – knowing what now know about ELF – we should start to think about what kind of English to teach.

Teaching English in the Age of ELF

Teaching

For Jennifer Jenkin’s, instead of conforming to a native standard such as British English, learners “need to learn not (a variety of) English but about Englishes, their similarities and differences, issues involved in intelligibility, the strong links between language and identity, and so on”.

In her research she has noticed that some allophonic variation is not evident in ELF conversations (e.g. ELF speakers do not differentiate between strong and weak forms; they substitute voiced “th” with /t/, /s/ and /d/ – think becomes sink or tink), she suggests only concentrating on core phonology. And finally, she suggests that in lexis teaching we should “avoid idiomatic usage” – because ELF speakers don’t use idioms.

Opposing Ideas

Vicky Kuo argues strongly against the view that native speakers are irrelevant or that native-speaker varieties have little prestige.

She points out that there is more to language use than “mere international intelligibility”. She says that the phenomenon that people are making use of their imperfect L2 repertoire to communicate more or less effectively “is interesting and revealing”, but doesn’t necessarily have any implications for teaching.

Based on responses from students in her doctoral research, she suggests that while a degree of inaccuracy may be tolerated in communication, it does not constitute an appropriate model for learning purposes, especially in a highly competitive world where accuracy and linguistic creativity not only in speech, but also in reading and writing may contribute towards success.

Native Speaker Varieties and Other Englishes

UK / USA

The differences between British and American English are well documented. For example;

British English speakers regularly use the phrase have got in utterances such as I’ve got a book about it or Have you got the time? when American English speakers are more likely to say I have a book and Do you have a time?

While British speakers in conversation make us of the present perfect in questions such as Have you read her latest article yet? an American English speakers might well say Did you read her latest article yet?

And there are many differences in vocabulary use (lift/elevator, flat/apartment, trousers/pants), pronunciation [/lɔː/ – law (British English) versus /lɔ/ (American English), advertisement (British English) versus advertisement (American English)] and even spelling (analyse/analyze, colour/color).

Variety

But there is a danger in calling in variety by the name of a country, since in doing we fail to take account of regional variety.

If we consider “British English”, for example, it only takes a moment’s thought to realize that there are many varieties of English withing the British Isles, each with its own vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar.

While a Londoner might get a take-away meal to eat at home, a Scottish person will order a carry-out. While an East-end Londoner might talk about having a “barf” (/bɑ:f/), a Yorkshireman talks about a bath (/bæθ/social class).

In addition to geography, factors such as social class, ethnic grouping and sex affect the language being used and influence the way in which listeners judge speakers.

In Britain, while some accents are admired (such as “BBC English” and some Scottish varieties), others (such as “Birmingham” accent) are still seen by many as less attractive. Though it is true that such attitudes diminished towards the end of the twentieth century – and some accents, such as “Cockney” and “Geordie” became widely admired, particularly in broadcast media – it is still the case that many British people ascribe status, educational background and social position to a person largely on the basis of accent.

World English Education

Around the world English is taught in a bewildering variety of situations. In many countries it first appears in the primary curriculum, but many universities in those and other continue to find that their entrants are sufficiently competent in English use, even if, as David Graddol points out, good English is an entry requirement for much tertiary education in a global market where English gives the user a “competitive advantage”.

English is taught in private schools and institutes all over the world, and even in specialized “English villages” in countries such as Korea and Japan, where pupils live in English-only environments in specially constructed theme-park-like environments.

A growing trend has been for Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), where, in secondary schools, a subject is taught through the medium of English. It other words, the students learn the language for mathematics at the same time as they learn the mathematics they are talking about in English, the language and the subjects are taught side-by-side.

It is clear from this short summary that the old world of English language teaching is in transition, especially in terms of the language schools which have traditionally taught general English.

Adaptation

But whatever kind of English it is, we cannot escape the need to decide on the variety or varieties which students are exposed to and learn. As we have seen, the choice seems to be between adopting one (perhaps native-speaker) variety, or, on the other hand, raising students’ awareness or “pluricentricity” so that they can adjust their speech “in order to be intelligible to interlocutors from a wide range of L1 backgrounds, most of whom are not inner circle native speakers”

Inner circle varieties become noticeably inappropriate when, for example, students in the Far East or South America are taught particularly British idioms such as I may as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb or learn the language for renting a flat in the south of England.

What seems to be the case, therefore, is that especially for beginner students, a prestige variety of the language (whether from the inner circle or from anywhere else) will be an appropriate pedagogical model.

The actual variety may depend on the wishes of the students, the variety the teacher himself uses, the learning materials that are on offer, or the school or education authority policy. Within that variety, it seems entirely appropriate to say what is and is not correct or acceptable so that students have something to aim at and some standard to judge their performance by.

As they become more advanced, the variety’s richness – including metaphor and idiom- should be offered for the students to absorb, provided that it is not too culture-specific. But at the same time, as Jennifer Jenkins has suggested, we need to expose our students to the reality of World English. As they become more advanced, our students should be made more and more aware of the different Englishes on offer.

However, we will have to ensure that they are not swamped by diversity, but rather guided gently into an appreciation of the global phenomenon that is English.

Important Notice: This note was prepared by Musa Kaan Durmuş, none of the used information here belongs to him.

Hello Everyone!

For a long time I wanted to talk about this specific song of Pink Guy due to its contradictory theme, depth of its lyrics and its success on conveying what it wants to convey.

First of all I want you to listen to the song with an open-mind because Pink Guy can be very morbid and offensive at times, but he does this in a purpose and I want you to understand this and continue regarding his style.

Okay, now let’s start talking about the lyrics and what I understand from them.

My Thoughts – Lyrics

[Verse 1]

I wake up in the mornings
Sinking halfway to the bottom
There's a loud distorted screaming in my soul
Everything is dark and empty
And I don't know how to fix it
So I curl up in a ball
And cry in the comfort of my home

Here Pink Guy conveys that he is in a heavy depression and every morning is an agony for him but instead of taking an action, he prefers to stay in his safe-zone as he is used to that safe-zone, he feels comfortable there although that zone is one of the factors which keeps him in that deep depression.

[Pre-Chorus]

I don't know why
I feel like shit
I say I'm fine but I'm not fine

Pink Guy ignores the reality and his emotions and expresses himself as the opposite to the others.

[Chorus]

I'm dying inside
And all I see are demons
I try to hide
All my deepest feelings
I'm dying inside
And all I see are demons
I try to hide
All my deepest feelings

Pink Guy is losing his will to live, his vision is blurred with sorrow of his depression, yet he will not share what he perceives as reality with others, locking himself in a box filled with negativity.

[Verse 2]

I think there's something wrong with me
'Cause all I see is death
Every time I go outside
I look like I've been doing meth
And I sleep for nineteen hours
On a Thursday afternoon
And every now and then I cough up blood
And I don't know what to do

While ignoring the reality, Pink Guys knows something is wrong with himself. He is in a deep depression that he can’t ever see the positive things in life at this point. He doesn’t care about his self-care, he doesn’t clean himself, he doesn’t sleep regularly, his medical condition is worsening but he insists on staying ignorant to himself.

[Pre-Chorus 2]

I don't know why
I feel like shit
I will not see a therapist

Pink Guy persists on staying ignorant to himself and denies a wind of change by locking himself away from others and their help.

[Spoken Bridge]

Ladies and gentlemen, if you wanna fucking kill yourself put your 
fucking hands up (yeah!), raise your blades in the air everybody
(yeah!)
[Coughing]
Ay, oh, ay, oh, ay, ay, ay, ay, ay, help, help, help, help, help, help,
HELP!

Pink Guy couldn’t endure anymore and wants to kill himself, he is worse now but within his last breaths he cries out for help.

[Chorus]

I'm dying inside
And all I see are demons
I try to hide
All my deepest feelings
I'm dying inside
And all I see are demons
I try to hide
All my deepest feelings

Nothing has changed for Pink Guy after all, he has chosen to stay in this vicious cycle between life and death, having no power or even will to change the situation.

What I Understand from This Song

Sometimes in life, we find ourselves in a state that is similar to Pink Guy’s state. Sometimes we feel sad, demoralized, exhausted, desperate and we feel like we can’t get out of that state.

When we are in that vicious state, instead of trying to change things, we prefer performing our habits as they distract us from the harsh reality, so that we won’t feel pain for a brief period of time. This situation reminds me Waiting for Godot, because it is exactly the same story.

We do what we are used to, we stay in our safe-zones, we stay in our homes, we don’t clean ourselves, we act like we don’t care while feeling the agony deep inside, yet we do not take an action for a wind of change.

When I listened to Help, I found myself in the song and in my memories and remembered once again that hard times won’t pass until I take an action for a wind of change.

Thank you for reading,